- Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words
 - Wasdale Head - Kate Peters
Words

A portrait of a place, a rural community and at risk farming traditions. The sheep are Herdwicks, an extremely hardy breed that survive all winter out on the fells. Having learned over hundred’s of years to graze in family groups and seek shelter without the need of shepherding. Their grazing is threatened by climate change effecting the land and attempts to stop soil erosion. The work focuses on the Wasdale Head shepherd’s meet which has been held for over 100 years. It was traditionally a place where farmers from the surrounding valleys could trade, hire or return straying sheep. It remains today and is an important part of the year for local famers and those further afield keen to celebrate and protect this important breed.